ALEXANDRA LAZAROWICH

Photo Credit: Alex Mitchell

Photo Credit: Alex Mitchell

I was sitting with a very successful colleague a few weeks back we were sharing stories about the industry and she said something that summarized exactly the feeling I couldn’t describe, “most people who are in the industry think it’s me, not we!”. As two indigenous women who are trying to navigate this tree filled path together, she so succinctly put into words how I feel about the work I create with communities, and how hard it can be to sit in a room, or have a meeting, or be at a film festival and listen to someone who makes art with only themselves in mind.

Being able to be an artist, being able to work with my friends and being able to do what I love makes me who I am and brings me so much joy and happiness but as the late Stan Lee says, with great power comes great responsibility. I think it is more then this, when you grow up in am indigenous community whether it is on a reservation or in a city there is something that is instilled in us from a very young age- something that I just assumed everyone else did also. This comes from my mother, my aunties, my older cousins, my Kookem and Moosem: when you have something you share, you offer to others, you welcome people at your table. I have taken this message to heart in all things within my work and how I act.  

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As someone who is incredibly privileged to do what I do – we all rise together. We have to because there is enough room for all of us, this means kindness, this means extending opportunity to others, this means hiring indigenous or POC filmmakers, this means trying to expand our circle. I have said and will say it again that we have more then enough talent out there, we have more then enough directors but what we need are people in positions of power. We need indigenous female executive sitting at the table making choices about who gets the green light, about who gets funded, about how gets picked to premiere at Sundance. Until we are allowed access into these spaces, and are given at rightful seat at the table no matter how much talent we all collectively have we will still be held back.

You can watch Alex’s latest film FAST HORSE below

ALEXANDRA LAZAROWICH is a Cree Producer, Director and Screenwriter whose work has premiered at film festivals around the world. She is passionate about telling indigenous stories. Her most recent film FAST HORSE best Short Form Documentary at imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival and can be watched in full at CBC Docs  . Alexandra’s body of work as a director and producer include Indian Rights for Indian Women, Out of Nothing, Cree Code Talker, Empty Metal, INAATE/SE/ and Alvaro. She was also the Creative Director for the new Royal Alberta Museum in Edmonton, Alberta (open October 2018). She directed thirty-one unique audio and video elements for the museum’s new Human History wing illuminating the cultures and histories of the Blackfoot, Cree, Denesųłįné, Dene Tha’, Métis, Nakota and Stoney Nakoda.

You can watch Alex’s latest film FAST HORSE below


Alexandra Daignault